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The Archive

Jasjyot Singh Hans

AP33

Designed by: Michele Outland
Cover by: Will Mebane

AI36

Designed by: Matt Vee
Interiors by: Merijn Hos

Let's Continue the Conversation ...

Please contact me (button at top) to let me know about any books, shows, or projects you’ve got going. Also visit the Pro Photo Daily Facebook page, if you haven't already. If you "Like" us you'll get updates of stories that don't make the Daily and shared stories from others. And of course we hope you will give us your opinions on some of the issues we address. You can find an archive of Pro Photo Daily posts at https://www.ai-ap.com/prophotodaily/ and a look at the best of some of our posts on our monthly Flipboard. Follow me on Twitter @davidschonauer.

Spotlight: Highlights from July

Ten percent of Americans think Elvis Presley is still alive. It's a point worth keeping in mind while viewing "Big Elvis," a short documentary about a 960-pound Elvis impersonator that is one of our highlighted films from July. Pete "Big Elvis" Vallee, performs in Nevada casinos you've never heard of. But his connection with the King of Rock and Roll goes beyond show business: He believes he is Elvis's love child. Among the other films we spotlight today: A study of a provocative ballet dancer from photographer Rankin, a tour of coastal California, and the moving story of a man rediscovering the mother he though he lost long ago.

Weekend notePad: 08.16.2018

Editor's Picks for a Cool Hot Weekend in New York Through Friday, August 17 Pope L. | Reenactor (2012-15), film reflecting on daily life in the United States during the American Civil War. Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26thStreet, NY, NY Info Saturday, August 18 Dance at Socrates, Week 2; Printmaking Workshop with the Crafty Lumberjack; Capoeira for Beginners; Yoga; Socrates Mini-Market. Socrates Sculpture Park, 32-01 Vernon Boulevard, at Broadway, Long Island City, NY&nb...

Spotlight: Portrait of the Escaramuza Cowgirl

Eight years ago, Dane Strom moved to Mexico. He'd quit his job as an editor with the Denver Post and headed south with a guitar, settling in a town in the subtropical mountains of Jalisco state, on the north shore of the country's largest lake, Lake Chapala. "All of my photography is now dedicated to Mexico, and the majority of it to this one town -- its culture, traditions, and annual fiestas," says Strom. Among the events he photographs is the charreria, the Mexican competitive sport of horsemanship, including women's escaramuza competition. His portrait of an escaramuza rider was named a winner of Latin American Fotografia 6.

Profile: Hope Wurmfeld's Memory of Rome, 1964

Hope Wurmfeld's love of Rome began 53 years ago. That's also when she discovered her love of photography. As she came to discover, the two passions -- Rome and photography -- are abidingly linked. In 1964, Wurmfeld moved to Rome after marrying her college boyfriend, who was there for year on a Fulbright scholarship. In the city's black market she bought two Leica cameras, several lenses, and a light meter, and then photographed everything she saw. Wurmfeld went on to become a noted fine-art photographer, but recently went through her archive and rediscovered her old images of Rome -- a Rome that is no more. Now they are collected in a new book.

The SONY a9: What the Pros Have to Say

"Eventually you knew it had to happen. Sooner or later cameras would get so good at what they did that basically your job as a photographer would be to look for interesting things to shoot and then try not to get in the camera's way as it did it's thing capturing them. I mean, imagine if a camera had pretty much flawless exposure capability, flawless focusing and could fire and focus so fast it never missed a frame?" So writes Jeff Wignall in todays Street Test of the Sony a9 full-frame mirrorless camera. Sony Artisans of Imagery Katrin Eisman, Andy Katz, and Pat Murphy-Racey join in with their takes on the 24.2-megapixel camera that has caused an uproar in the photo industry.