Register

The DART Board: 02.03.2021

By Peggy Roalf   Wednesday February 3, 2021


Thursday, February 4
The International Center of Photography (ICP) opens its winter/spring 2021 exhibition: But Still, It Turns: Recent Photography from the World, guest curated by photographer Paul Graham. The exhibition—on view February 4 through May 9, 2021—comes on the heels of ICP’s reopening of its galleries on October 1 following a six-month closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic and arrives just as ICP celebrates its first anniversary at its new home on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.  Above: Curran Hatleberg, Lost Coast (8), 2014. © Curran Hatleberg

In But Still, It Turns, nine contemporary photographers present images made in the 21st-century United States that reflect a movement towards a lyrical documentary practice. Extending the tradition of Robert Frank, Walker Evans, Gordon Parks, and Diane Arbus, this work fits a notion of “photography from the world”—photography that resists both narrative arcs and the drama of photojournalism or staged photography, grappling instead with the world as it is, in all its ambiguity and wonder. 

In But Still, It Turns, nine contemporary photographers present images made in the 21st-century United States that reflect a movement towards a lyrical documentary practice. Extending the tradition of Robert Frank, Walker Evans, Gordon Parks, and Diane Arbus, this work fits a notion of “photography from the world”—photography that resists both narrative arcs and the drama of photojournalism or staged photography, grappling instead with the world as it is, in all its ambiguity and wonder. 

The opening hours for But Still, It Turns: Recent Photography from the World are Thursday through Sunday, 11 AM to 7 PM, February 4–May 9, 2021. International Center of Photography, 79 Essex Street, New York, NY 10002


The opening hours for But Still, It Turns: Recent Photography from the World are Thursday through Sunday, 11 AM to 7 PM, February 4–May 9, 2021. International Center of Photography, 79 Essex Street, New York, NY 10002

Thursday, February 4th, 6:30-8 PM EST  |  Live On Zoom

This roundtable discussion on sustainable fashion, impact on the land, and cultural identity will be hosted by exhibiting artist Tatiana Arocha in her tea salon project, Impending Beauty, and Land Akin curator Gabriel de Guzman. Joining the conversation will be guest speakers Angel Chang, American designer who works with indigenous artisans in rural China to make her seed-to-button, zero carbon womenswear line, and Céline Semaan, designer, advocate, writer, and founder of the Slow Factory Foundation, as well as exhibiting artists Esteban Cabeza de Baca and Allison Maria Rodriguez. The participants will discuss topics such as how to produce clothing in an environmentally responsible way using ethical labor practices and how fashion can reflect diverse cultural identities while expressing decolonial political views. For more information about the program participants, click here

Tuesdays from 7:00-8:30 PM (EDT
In February: Olio by Tyehimba Jess, who will join the One Book One Bronx conversation, liveClick here to register 

One Book One Bronx is a new style reading group that inspires, encourages, and delights readers. Every week, we meet to discuss one book that reflects the people of the Bronx.

Part fact, part fiction, Tyehimba Jess's Pulitzer Prize-wining second book weaves sonnet, song, and narrative to examine the lives of mostly unrecorded African American performers directly before and after the Civil War up to World War I. Olio is an effort to understand how they met, resisted, complicated, co-opted, and sometimes defeated attempts to minstrelize them.

More information about this reading group which is part of Lift Every Voice: Why African American Poetry Matters, a nation-wide series of programs. This program is produced in collaboration with The Center for Humanities and Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative.

 

Through February 28

Black History Month at the New York Botanical Garden

The New York Botanical Garden’s annual celebration of Black History Month takes place online this year with engaging digital programs that can be enjoyed at home. Throughout the month, Black History Month at Home showcases cultural traditions of the African diaspora and explores the influential contributions of Black people to botany, horticulture, ecology. Discover captivating dance, creative, important historical narratives, and fascinating plant stories. Info

Programs for Adults 

The Hand Lens: Focus on Black Botanists
A series of blog posts highlights Black botanists and their many contributions to the field of science, past and present, including: 

Thomas Gaither, ActivistandBiologist
Behind each collection is the life of the collector, often lost to history. We’re excited to celebrate the contributions of Dr. Gaither, both of his fungal collections, and to advancements in the fight for civil rights. 

LafayetteFrederick,FungalSystematist
See a type specimen of fungal species described by Dr. Lafayette Frederick, a mycologist who followed in George Washington Carver’s footsteps to understand and document all manner of plant pathogens. 

NYBG Beyond Books Club: Black History Month
Sign up for the NYBG Beyond Books Club on Facebook for a group discussion of published digital articles from prominent Black mycologists Dr. Thomas Gaither and Dr. Lafayette Frederick, as well as Plant Talk blog posts. Special discussion questions will be curated by staff from the Botanical Garden’s William and Lynda Steere Herbarium. 

Inside Black Botany: A Conversation with the Curators
February 23; 6 p.m.
Join us for a conversation with Rashad Bell and Nuala Caomhanach, curators of NYBG’s online exhibit Black Botany: The Nature of Black Experience that seeks to acknowledge the complex relationship between enslaved Black people, nature, and the colonial environment— and reconsider the conscious omission of Black knowledge of the natural world. Register

Extended through February 13 at Janet Borden Gallery

Martin Parr | World Tour

The world is closed, but the gallery is open. Come tour the globe with renowned British photographer Martin Parr.

Janet Borden, Inc., 91 Water Street, in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Gallery hours are Tuesday - Saturday, 11 - 5. Info: (212) 431 0166 or email info@janetbordeninc.com

 

 

February 17,12 pm EST, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Photographer Judith Joy Ross Live in Conversation With Curator Peter Barberie 

Recognized as one of the most incisive portraitists in the contemporary photography, Judith Joy Ross has produced numerous series since the 1980s, all of which look at broad aspects of contemporary life through individual portraits. Her subjects have ranged from teenagers in her hometown region of Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley, to visitors at the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, DC, members of the United States Congress, and citizens protesting the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Capacity is limited, so book your free ticket now. Above: Judith Joy Ross, "Girl Scouts with Ducks, Allentown, Pennsylvania" (2009), printed 2017

 

Thursday, February 11, 7:00 p.m. EST
Aperture Conversations – Joshua Rashaad McFadden
 Presented in partnership with the Parsons School of Design, The New School

Aperture is pleased to present an artist talk with Joshua Rashaad McFadden. Through the use of photography and archive, McFadden explores African American male identity, masculinity, and notions of the father figure—providing a frame of reference that articulates the many personalities of Black men. His work continually investigates themes related to identity, masculinity, history, race, and sexuality. McFadden also documents social justice issues related to police brutality and the continuing protests across the United States. Register

 

 

Wednesday, February 17, 4pm ET | SohoPhotoGallery

Kris Graves In Conversation on the Landscape of America

Kris Graves discusses his current work, including Latency, his recent assignment for National Geographic Magazine, photographing the southern Confederate monuments and Privileged Mediocrity, his upcoming book.

Kris Graves is an artist and publisher based in New York and London. He has been published and exhibited globally, including the National Portrait Gallery in London and Aperture Gallery in New York. Permanent collections include the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the New York Public Library Schomburg Center.

Since our founding in 1971 by New York Times photographers, Soho Photo Gallery, a member-artist run organization, has created a special photography community, through various programs and platforms for both emerging and established photographers, and through the increasing appreciation of photography. Register Above: © Kris Graves, Murder of Michael Brown

 

Note from the Home Office

Mark Heflin, Director, AI-AP, has announced the American Photography 37 jury panel of art, photo and design creative professionals, who hire and assign photography and illustration. The panel is chaired this year by Arem Duplessis, Group Creative Director, Apple. The jurors are Brian Bantog, Art Director, Nike; Stella Blackmon, Photo Editor, New York Magazine; Jane Clark, Photography Director, AARP Media; Vida Cornelious, Executive Creative Director, T Brand Studio/New York Times; Leslie dela Vega, Director of Visuals, OZY MEDIA; Natalia Jiménez, Picture Editor, The Washington Post; Gianmaria Schonlieb, Creative Director, Lyft; Philip Brian Tabuas, Photo Editor, Bloomberg News; Ronda Thompson, Web Design Consultant, Bed Bath & Beyond. Info

0 Comments

No comments yet.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now


DART