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What We Learned This Week: An Affirmation for Fair Use

What constitutes "fair use" appropriation of an image? That can be a vexing question, but whatever it is, an Obama administration task force wants more of it. We learned this week that the US Department of Commerce's Internet Policy Task Force has called for "a vibrant fair use space" that allows "the broad range of remixes to thrive." At the same time, the task force recommends creating copyright small claims courts to streamline the procedures for adjudicating infringement cases. Even the New York Times may be confused over fair use: A recent copyright lawsuit filed by the newspaper of record was described as a "hissy fit" by one expert.

See It Now: Eddie Alcazar's Seductive, Repulsive Sundance Short

A collaboration between music producer Flying Lotus and director Eddie Alcazar, the short film FUCKKKYOUUU  premiered at the 2015 Sundance NEXT festival and was an official selection of this year’s Sundance festival. Now it is making a big buzz online and, as Short of the Week notes, you may find yourself both repulsed and seduced by it. The black-and-white 16mm film features a humanoid character akin to the “human curiosity” of David Lynch’s Elephant Man  — misshapen and introverted — and a version of time travel that, as SOTW notes, is really an inward journey. There is nudity and gore, which you may or may not love. But you won’t soon forget the film.

Esther K. Smith: Making Books with Kids

Esther K. Smith teaches the art of the book to the creative and the curious. First through classes and workshops, and later through her books (How to Make Books; The Paper Bride). Now, with Making Books with Kids: 25 Paper Projects to Fold, Sew, Paste, Pop, and Draw (Quarto 2016), she invites people of all ages and interests to discover a world of magic and to create colorful multi-dimensional books that express their interests. From the simplest booklet (a sheet of copy pap...

Latin American Ilustracion: Alvaro Naddeo

Originally from Sao Paulo, Brazil, illustrator Alvaro Naddeo has also lived in Lima, Peru, and New York City and Los Angeles, which is his current home. "These urban environments have shaped my memory and permeate most of my work," he says. His series of paintings titled "Another Life," named a winner of the Latin American Ilustracion 4 competition, tell the story of a man by depicting the small objects and personal possessions surrounding him. Trash found on the street is not as worthless as it may seem, Naddeo says.

Illustrator Profile - Diego Patino: "I take each assignment very personally"

Diego Patino is a very dynamic and very exciting illustrator who is based in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. He grew up in Colombia and worked as a journalist before moving to Australia and then New York City. Patino's illustrations have provided graphic power for covers of soccer magazine Eight By Eight and Newsweek, and have appeared in numerous other publications. Patino puts lots of passion and engagement in his work-he says "My preferred mediums are sweat and tears." He grew up on a diet of "Garbage Pail Kids, cheap comics strips, odd TV and movies," and his work is a cool mix of those vintage graphic influences and classic comic books, blended with his bold lines and bright colors. Patino has a wide range of styles, from stark and sophisticated black and white to psychedelic comics-influenced portraits, all of them beautifully and smartly rendered.